ECO-FRIENDLY APPROACH TO THE MANAGEMENT OF Oidium mangiferae OF MANGO THROUGH BIOLOGICAL CONTROL: A REVIEW | PLANT CELL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Powdery mildew, caused by Oidium mangiferae, is a serious mango disease that causes both quantitative and qualitative losses. Despite the fact that agro-synthetic materials have successfully regulated disease at a reasonable rate, inquiry for eco-friendly, practicable, minimal effort methodologies is unavoidable due to essential cost, non-eco-friendly character, and the opposite outcomes of substance control procedures. This paper focuses on an environmentally friendly strategy to managing Oidium mangiferae, as well as the future prospects of elemental research in plant disease control using non-chemical methods.

Please see the link :- https://ikprress.org/index.php/PCBMB/article/view/5806

PRODUCTIVE LONGEVITY OF LEGUMES IN PURE SWARDS AND MIXTURES WITH GRASSES | PLANT CELL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

The research was done at the field experimental site of the Russian State Agrarian University — Moscow Timiryazev Agricultural Academy from 1996 to 2019. The goal of the study was to see how long different alfalfa varieties could produce when grown as single-species crops or in combinations with grain grasses with two or three mows per season. Pastbishnaya 88 and Selena alfalfa types survived in the composition of herbage for 12-14 years on well-cultivated sod-podzolic soils in amounts of 35-45 percent. The productive longevity of red clover did not exceed three years, and white clover took part in phytocenoses in the 24th year of life, but it sharply reduced its share in the yield with a lack of moisture. Timothy grass almost completely dropped out of herbage in the 5 th year of life, and smooth brome showed high resistance when two mows per season were carried out and nitrogen was applied at a dose of 90 kg/ha. Its share in the botanical composition of herbage in the 19th year of life amounted to 71.9%, while without nitrogen it was only 23.3%. Alfalfa-grasses mixtures and single-species alfalfa crops for 12-14 years provided yields at the level of 5-6 t/ha of dry weight with two mows per season and 4-5 t/ha with three mows per season. Even in the 15-17th year of life, the yield of herbage with smooth brome dominance when nitrogen fertilisers were applied was 4.1 and 3.6 t/ha of dry matter at two and three mows, respectively.

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FERMENTED SEAWEED (Kappaphycus alverezii) BY-PRODUCT PROMOTES GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF LETTUCE (Lactuca sativa VAR. CURLY GREEN) | PLANT CELL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Seaweed processing into juice extraction yields a considerable volume by product, with 800 grammes (80 percent) of residue going to waste following the extraction from a kilo of seaweed (Kappaphycus alverezii). The goal of this study was to employ Fermented Marine Macro Algae Residue to boost lettuce growth and yield in terms of height, growth rate, leaf length, and above and below ground fresh weight. A commercially available seaweed-based fertiliser (10ml/L) was compared to solid seaweed sludge (by-product of fermentation at 10tons/ha), fermented liquid seaweed (10ml/L), and a mix of both. Plant height after five days following transplanting for lettuce (Lactuca sativa var. Curly Green) indicated that seaweed sludge (solid seaweed fertiliser) outperformed commercial fertiliser at 10.010.72SE cm and 6.280.0.57SE cm, respectively. On the 20th day, the plants with the tallest plants (plant height) and the longest leaves (13.870.42SE cm and 15.430.54SE cm, respectively) were created using a mixture of liquid and solid seaweed fertiliser. With a combination application of liquid and solid seaweed fertiliser at 5.310.444SE cm, the fastest growth rate was achieved between 16 and 20 days. The highest growth rate was achieved by using solid seaweed fertiliser alone from transplanting (0-5 days) (4.080.44SE cm/5-days). Liquid fertiliser application resulted in almost three times larger above ground weight (270.17163.61SE g/plant) than all other treatments with equivalent below ground weight. As a result, waste products from the processing of seaweed-based beverages can be used as fertiliser in both liquid and solid form, and more significantly, in combination, for the production of lettuce.

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ANXIOLYTIC POTENTIAL OF MEDICINAL PLANTS- A REVIEW | PLANT CELL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

According to recent estimates, approximately 970 million people worldwide suffer from mental illness. Over 284 million individuals in the world suffer from anxiety disorders, 264 million from depression, 45 million from bipolar illness, 20 million from schizophrenia, and more than 50 million from dementia. Anxiety disorders are the most frequent mental ailment, affecting about 4% of the world’s population. Anxiety disorders have a high prevalence rate, and they also account for a significant portion of the costs associated with their treatment. These horrifying statistics are drawing experts’ attention to pharmacotherapeutic techniques for treating modernization-related problems. Medicinal chemists have looked at a variety of chemicals to prevent anxiety disorders, but there is still a lot more work to be done in this field. The high systemic toxicity of synthetic medications (barbiturates, benzodiazepines, and others) has expedited the quest for innovative natural compounds that can treat anxiety disorders and are less or non-toxic to humans. ScienceDirect, SciFinder, Chemical Abstracts, PubMed, Dr. Dukes Phytochemical & Ethnobotany, InteliHealth, CIMER, and other databases were used to compile the current review. The current review focuses on the botanical name, common name, part/extract/isolated phytoconstituent utilised, dosage, mechanism of action, animal models/clinical parameters in humans, and patented formulations of numerous plants used for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

Please see the link :- https://ikprress.org/index.php/PCBMB/article/view/5802