COMBINED APPLICATION OF FERMENTED BAMBOO (Bambusa spinosa) AND MOLLUSK (Achatina fulica) LIQUID FERTILIZER CAN IMPROVED LETTUCE (Lactuca sativa var. CURLY GREEN) PRODUCTION |  PLANT CELL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY,

The Philippine countryside is filled with giant bamboos (Bambusa spinosa), which are high in carbs, protein, and minerals. In the meantime, the Japanese snail (Achatina fulica) is a mollusc nuisance that may be found in most Philippine gardens. Organic farming may restore the natural fertility of degraded soils by increasing soil organic matter, which will boost crop productivity in green vegetables like lettuce (Lactuca sativa var. Curly Green). In three replications, four treatments (T0: commercially available liquid fermentation-based fertiliser, T1: fermented bamboo shoot-based liquid fertiliser, T2: fermented Japanese snail-based liquid fertiliser, and T3: combination of both bamboo and Japanese snail-based liquid fertiliser) were tested to see how they affected weekly height, leaf length, and above and below ground fresh wet weight. For all treatments, the appropriate rate of commercial liquid fertiliser (10ml/L) was used. The combined usage of bamboo and Japanese snail-based liquid fertiliser is generally comparable to using commercially available liquid fermentation-based fertiliser for leaf erectness (plant height) and length of leaves. The combined application of Japanese snail and bamboo shoot liquid fertiliser was 13.880.51SE cm high and had leaves that were 15.780.78SE cm long at the time of termination. Lettuce grown with commercial liquid fertiliser reached a height of 14.011.11SE cm, with leaves measuring 15.750.86SE cm. After 20 days, all treatments had around four completely opened leaves. After four weeks, lettuce grown with fermented bamboo shoot-based liquid fertiliser alone produced the least amount of above and below ground fresh weight, averaging 804.47SE and 39.332.89SE g/plant, respectively. These findings show that using bamboo shoots and Japanese snails together as a liquid fermented fertiliser for organic lettuce cultivation could be a viable option.

Please see the link :- https://www.ikprress.org/index.php/PCBMB/article/view/5855  

INTERACTIVE EFFECT OF PH AND TEMPERATURE ON GROWTH AND BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN T. aestivum and T. durum VARIETIES |  PLANT CELL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY.

Extreme temperature and pH have a negative impact on wheat productivity. In addition, the interaction of temperature and pH has a significant impact on plant growth and development. Seven days old wheat varieties of Triticum aestivum (HI1418, HI1500, HI1531, HI1544, HI1563, HD2932) and Triticum durum (HD4672, HI8381, HI8498, HI8627, HI8663, HI8737) were assessed for nine various pH (4.0, 5.0, 6.0) and temperature (10°, 20°, 30°C) combinations in this study. In a static hydroponic setting, seedlings were supplied with one-fourth strength hoag land nutrient solution. The effect of temperature on fresh tissue weight, length, and chlorophyll concentration was more pronounced. At 20°C and 30°C, the weight, length, and chlorophyll content of new shoot tissue increased for all T. aestivum and T. durum types. Both species’ root weight and length were only slightly altered. The effect of pH on NR activity, protein, and proline content could be seen. At pH 6, NR activity declined as temperature increased, whereas at pH 4 and 5, activity increased up to 20°C in T. aestivum and T. durum types. Except for HI1544, protein content in T. aestivum shoot tissue was high at pH 4 temperature 10°C, but in root tissue it was pH 5 temperature 20°C. T. durum, on the other hand, had a high protein concentration at pH 6 and a temperature of 20°C. At 10°C, both species had high proline content, which declined as temperature increased, with the exception of HI1544, HI1563, and HD2932 at pH4. T. durum had high protein and low proline content when compared to T. aestivum. Furthermore, HD 4672, HI 8498, and HI 8737 cultivars had low proline and high protein content at pH 5, suggesting that they might be grown on non-arable land.

Please see the link :- https://www.ikprress.org/index.php/PCBMB/article/view/5853

THERAPEUTIC POTENTIALS OF BIOSYNTHESIZED SILVER NANOPARTICLES FROM Phyllanthus amarus LEAF AGAINST RESISTANT CLINICAL BACTERIAL ISOLATES |  Journal of International Research in Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences

The endurance of infectious agents to medications is a serious danger worldwide. This endurance to medications implies increase in number of death that can leads to decrease in human population. Antibiotic resistance mostly triggered by antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) is the most terrifying. The present therapeutic measures used on antibiotic enduring bacteria have a setback like its inability to kill the target bacteria. Both the search and interest for brand-new therapeutics that can overpower this setback has preceded to massive investigation on plants phytochemicals. Preparations from plants sources tend to be favourable with little or no side effects in comparison with synthetic drugs. Nevertheless curative attribute of preparations from plant sources becomes conceded as a result of their little bio-obtainability. Incorporation of the plants phytochemicals with innovative methods of delivery in form of nanocarriers can overpower this setback. The aim of the research is to verify the therapeutic and ethnopharmacological potentials of bio-synthesized AgNPs from Phyllanthus amarus plant leaf as an antibacterial agent against resistant bacterial isolates. Preliminary phytochemical analysis showed the presence of flavonoids, saponins, tannins, glycosides and triterpenoids. The in vitro antibacterial activity of biologically synthesized AgNPs from Phyllanthus amarus aqueous leaf extract was determined by agar disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. The results of the bioassay obtained showed that the biologically synthesized AgNPs had antibacterial potential against the clinical resistance bacterial isolates. Both the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) for the biologically synthesized AgNPs ranges from 125µg/ml-500 µg/ml.

Please see the link :- https://www.ikprress.org/index.php/JIRMEPS/article/view/5851

INFLUENCE OF Azadirachta indica L AS PHYTOGENIC FEED SUPPLEMENT ON THE GROWTH PERFORMANCE AND IMMUNOMODULATORY RESPONSE OF BROILER CHICKENS |  Journal of Biology and Nature,

This research looks at Azadirachta indica (neem leaf) as a phytobiotic feed addition to synthetic antibiotics in broiler chicken production. A total of 300 Arbor-Acre day-old broiler chicks were randomly assigned to six different food treatments, each with fifty birds. Each treatment was repeated five times, with each replicate including ten birds. There were six isocaloric and isonitrogenous diets created. Diet 1 (0 percent NLM; +ve control), diet 2 (0 percent NLM; -ve control), diet 3 (0.50 percent NLM), diet 4 (1.00 percent NLM), diet 5 (1.50 percent NLM), and diet 6 (1.50 percent NLM) were the basal diets supplemented with neem leaf meal (NLM) (2.00 percent NLM). When compared to those on diet 1 (+ve control), NLM supplementation boosted body weight gain by 2.29-5.41 percent at 1-3 weeks of age and 2.51-4.98 percent at 1-6 weeks of age (P = 0.05). Broiler chicken slaughter, dressed weights, white blood cell (WBC) counts, heterophil, monocytes, and platelets all improved (P = 0.05), while aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alanine phosphatase (ALP), glucose, low density lipoprotein (LDL), cholesterol, and triglycerides all decreased significantly (P = 0.05). In conclusion, Azadirachta indica leaf meal revealed to be a viable alternative to synthetic antibiotics in broiler hens, improving weight gain, immune system function, and overall health.

Please see the link :- https://www.ikprress.org/index.php/JOBAN/article/view/5848