THE ROLES OF URBAN AGRICULTURE FOR CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTION IN THE CASE OF DEBRE MARKOS TOWN AND SURROUNDING DISTRICTS EAST GOJJAM ZONE AMHARA REGION ETHIOPIA |  Journal of Global Ecology and Environment

The most significant causes to climate change are arguably rapid urbanisation and large-scale food production, both of which are largely reliant on fossil fuels. They’re also becoming more widely acknowledged as potential climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. Climate change has already had an impact on food production systems, resulting in crop losses, grain shortages, and increasing commodity prices, all of which jeopardise food security, which is a basic human right. This research shows that urban agriculture is a multifaceted tool for climate change adaptation and mitigation, as well as an effective tool for addressing food security challenges in cities, as well as educating and connecting urban and periurban farms and people to ensure food and climate security in cities.

Please see the link :- https://www.ikprress.org/index.php/JOGEE/article/view/4838

QUANTIFICATION OF AIR POLLUTION AND ITS POTENTIAL CONSEQUENCE IN GUATEMALA |  Journal of Global Ecology and Environment

Many countries around the world are experiencing an increase in health problems. Some of the most prominent contributors include air pollution and global warming. People in emerging countries, such as China, India, and Guatemala, are getting severe illnesses like pneumonia, carbon monoxide poisoning, and a variety of cardiac and respiratory disorders as a result of air pollution released mostly during rapid economic development. Most developing countries are unable to provide adequate funding for medical treatment or are unaware of the long-term repercussions of these diseases. Carbon monoxide, among other air contaminants, poses a serious concern, owing to its toxicity and invisibility to humans. Despite substantial research into the life-threatening effects of carbon monoxide poisoning, proper precautions have yet to be taken. The study’s goal was to illustrate the link between fast urbanisation and carbon monoxide levels in a developing country. Our research team travelled to Guatemala to measure carbon monoxide levels in a variety of settings, including population, habitation, transportation, urbanisation, and the usage of various ventilation systems. An Easy Log El-USB-CO was utilised in places with high levels of carbon monoxide (CO). CO levels in densely populated metropolitan areas rose to 200 ppm and remained elevated for almost 5 hours, with ups and downs. Our findings backed up accusations that Guatemalans have been poisoned by carbon monoxide and that the country’s central authority should develop strategies to tackle this ongoing, silent plague.

Please see the link :- https://www.ikprress.org/index.php/JOGEE/article/view/4831

IMPACT OF SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL ON THE HEALTH OF SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS OF OGBA/EGBEMA/NDONI LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA (ONELGA), RIVERS STATE, NIGERIA |  Journal of Global Ecology and Environment

The purpose of this study is to look into the influence of solid waste disposal on the health of secondary school pupils in Rivers State’s Ogba/Egbema/Ndoni Local Government Area. The study was directed by two research questions. This research used a descriptive research design. The research was conducted in secondary schools in the Ogba Egbema Ndoni Local Government Area. The study’s target demographic was all secondary school students, teachers, and administrators in Ogba/Egbema/Ndoni LG.A. A total of 200 people were chosen at random from five secondary schools in ONELGA for the study. To appropriately manipulate the huge population, the researcher utilised a sampling strategy. A questionnaire was utilised to obtain the information. Before it was given out, the test already had face and content validity. The researcher gathered the data for this study directly from the students, teachers, and proprietors of the selected schools in ONELGA. The SPSS statistical software was used to analyse the data collected. To present the data, frequency distributions and other descriptive statistics were used. The study’s findings found that solid waste disposal had a negative influence on the health of secondary school children in Rivers State’s Ogba/Egbema/Ndoni Local Government Area. As a result, the researcher proposed that the government provide enough disposal sites for solid waste for schools, and that the dumping sites for trash be located far away from the school environment. Schools should be provided with waste disposal equipment to avoid dumping waste in the environment and to prevent decay of these wastes in the school environment, which can lead to a variety of diseases. Additionally, funds should be raised for programmes that educate students about proper waste management.

Please see the link :- https://www.ikprress.org/index.php/JOGEE/article/view/4807

ENVIRONMENTAL AND HEALTH EFFECTS OF WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN OGBA/EGBEMA/NDONI LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA (ONELGA) RIVERS STATE, NIGERIA |  Journal of Global Ecology and Environment

The purpose of this study is to look into the environmental and health effects of waste management in the Rivers State local government area of Ogba/Egbema/Ndoni. The goal is to investigate the environmental, health, and economic consequences of inappropriate waste management in the Ogba/Egbema/Ndoni Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria. The survey design was used for this study because it entails gathering data on research issues as they were at the time of the investigation. The data was gathered using a random sample technique. The sample size was 400 men and women from various sections of the local government jurisdiction. The research questions were answered using mean and standard deviation, while hypotheses were assessed using regression at the 0.05 level of significance. The study found a moderate (r = -.560) association between waste management’s environmental and health implications in the Ogba/Egbema/Ndoni local government region. The R-square value of 0.313 revealed that waste management contributed around 31% to their health. As a result, the regression equation indicates that an increase in inadequate waste management may result in a corresponding decline in the area’s health. Following that, the study discovered that poor waste management has detrimental consequences for both the environment and public health. The findings also showed that when you go away from the dumpsite, the impact is less severe than it is closer to the dumpsite. Laws governing dumpsite locations should be revised by the government and municipalities. These regulations should cover well-managed areas that are well-fenced and kept away from human settlements.

Please see the link :- https://www.ikprress.org/index.php/JOGEE/article/view/4789