Tag: Bambusa

ROLE OF MOLECULAR MARKERS TO STUDY GENETIC DIVERSITY IN BAMBOO: A REVIEW  |  PLANT CELL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

The genus Bambusa (family Poaceae) is the world’s fastest growing grass, adapting to a wide range of environmental conditions. Bamboos are used to make poles, paper, charcoal, and candles, among other things. The majority of bamboo species are edible and have a high nutritional and mineral value. Fresh and dried bamboo shoots, leaves, and other parts are consumed as food. Because of its great nutritional value, edible bamboos are used to make tea, pickles, and a variety of other dishes. To meet the bamboo’s requirements, flowering occurs infrequently and seed viability is limited. Bamboo can be grown in a lab setting. Bamboo is grown in the laboratory using various explants. Traditional techniques of classifying bamboo are ineffective because it is found all over the world and has a wide genetic variation. Around 1200 species of bamboo are native to Asia and the New World, and their genetic diversity may be assessed using various molecular markers. A variety of molecular markers are available to aid in the classification of bamboo and the detection of genetic variability in bamboo. The use of molecular markers in the genetic evaluation of bamboo species is highlighted in this paper.

Please see the link :- https://ikprress.org/index.php/PCBMB/article/view/5860

ROLE OF MOLECULAR MARKERS TO STUDY GENETIC DIVERSITY IN BAMBOO: A REVIEW  |  PLANT CELL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

The genus Bambusa (family Poaceae) is the world’s fastest growing grass, adapting to a wide range of environmental conditions. Bamboos are used to make poles, paper, charcoal, and candles, among other things. The majority of bamboo species are edible and have a high nutritional and mineral value. Fresh and dried bamboo shoots, leaves, and other parts are consumed as food. Because of its great nutritional value, edible bamboos are used to make tea, pickles, and a variety of other dishes. To meet the bamboo’s requirements, flowering occurs infrequently and seed viability is limited. Bamboo can be grown in a lab setting. Bamboo is grown in the laboratory using various explants. Traditional techniques of classifying bamboo are ineffective because it is found all over the world and has a wide genetic variation. Around 1200 species of bamboo are native to Asia and the New World, and their genetic diversity may be assessed using various molecular markers. A variety of molecular markers are available to aid in the classification of bamboo and the detection of genetic variability in bamboo. The use of molecular markers in the genetic evaluation of bamboo species is highlighted in this paper.

Please see the link :- https://ikprress.org/index.php/PCBMB/article/view/5860